Capstone – Week 4

The End of Week 3

After spending two weeks working on prototypes for our 4 ideas, it was time to get some feedback, and make a decision.

On the Saturday of Week 3, we each collected feedback on our prototypes (mostly from friends and roommates). The following day, we reconvened in our usually library meetup spot to chat about the QA feedback, then have a discussion to decide our fate (which game we would try to move forward with). After our discussion of the QA feedback, we then had an anonymous vote where we each voted for our two favorite ideas. A few of us (including myself) started to think that maybe Layers had some hidden potential. Nobody voted for the Lemon game. Since both Layers and Footsteps both got three votes, we decided to choose between those two. After going back and forth on the pros and cons of each for about 2 or 3 hours, we still couldn’t make a decision.

We reconvened for an online meeting later that night. Fortunately, this one took a lot less time, and we ended up deciding on the Footsteps game. Ultimately, it seemed like the game we were most prepared to present. In class the following day, we presented our ideas and received some good feedback.

Week 4

After our presentation to the class it seemed that we basically had 2 frontrunners: ACTF and Footsteps. The other two games (Layers and Mutant Lemon), we had decided as a team, had reasons why we didn’t want to go forward with them. I had been considering Layers on Sunday, I guess because I thought it had some kind of hidden potential. But ultimately, it’s downfall was that it would take at least another week to develop the idea to the point where we could feel comfortable presenting it as something we would go forward with. At this point, we need all the time we can get. Mutant Lemon, while an idea that we liked, was ultimately a bit too silly for our collective tastes. I think we realized that if we didn’t pull it off correctly, it either wouldn’t be taken seriously or it could be seen as too similar to the dreaded ball-roller genre. I can see myself working on it in other contexts, but just not for this capstone.

And that brings us to ACTF and Footsteps. I had counted out ACTF a bit at our decision meeting, probably because I just kept having thoughts about possible worst-case scenarios. But, in reality, networking is a lot easier in Unity than in the lower-level format Ben and I had learned it in. Even so, networking adds additional time and complexity to any project you decide to use it on, but still. ACTF was an idea that people seemed to get excited about, in regards to the traps especially. Additionally, it was a game that fit our strengths as a team: Alexis wants to specialize in hard-surface modeling (robots, metallic sci-fi environments, etc) – which this game would have a lot of, the game would have a lot of level design (which Eva really enjoys), and Ben and I could divide the programming tasks between ourselves according to our strengths.

Meanwhile, Footsteps provides some advantages, mostly being that it would be a lot easier to make (in theory) – it’s single player, has no networking, and could potentially have a lot of modular low-poly art.

But, in our meeting the day after the presentation, we decided that if Layers was off the table (no one had voted for the Lemon game in the decision meeting), we would consider ACTF. And soon after that point had been brought up, and after considering the feedback from class, we decided to switch to ACTF as the idea we would move forward with. It was just an idea that we seemed to be more excited about.

So that’s where we stand right now. We’re moving forward with ACTF. It’ll probably be more work than the Footsteps game, but it’ll also probably be a lot more rewarding if we manage to pull it off.

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